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J Moore (a shunter)

In this post, Chris Jolliffe, one of the project volunteers based at the Modern Records Centre at the University of Warwick and transcribing trade union records, picks up on one case that emerged from the ‘Transcription Tuesday’ event. In it, she delves deeper into the sources to pull together a much more complete picture of […]

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Family Tree Live – here we come!

We’re delighted to say we’re going to be at Family Tree Live at Alexandra Palace later this month – and we want to see you there! We’ll be on stand 31, and will be making ourselves as obvious as possible. We’ve been working with family historians and genealogists for some time, including trying to make […]

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Bartholomew Stephenson – from pub landlord to permanent way worker

We’re pleased to be able to feature another guest post, from another person the project has been able to help. John contacted us via our feedback form to let us know that he’d made use of the project database and found it useful – something we always like to hear, so do get in touch […]

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‘a question whether a man who suffers under this disability should occupy such a position’

Perhaps surprisingly, the question of literacy doesn’t seem to come up in the worker accident reports too frequently. It appears as though in most cases railway staff had at least a functional level of reading. Presumably their level was more than just functional, too, given the key document employees were reading, so far as the […]

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Getting more than your fingers burnt

We’ve featured a burns case in the past – in that instance, it was electrical burns. But often lumped together with burns are scalds, something we’ve not discussed until now. As you might expect, working around steam locos exposed some staff to hot steam. There are relatively few of these cases in our database, though […]

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From injury to fatality

In past blog posts we’ve discussed some of the cases of workers known to have had more than one accident – a theme to which we return today. Albert Robert Cox forms part of the group of 14 individuals who each had 2 accidents. His first documented accident took place on 25 November 1911, at […]

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